Key Highlights from “Data at the Heart of Health Care”

Key Highlights from “Data at the Heart of Health Care”

 

 

Capventis, in conjunction with Qlik, ran two very well-attended events in Belfast and Dublin this week on the theme “Data at the Heart of Health Care”.  Attendees included 4 of the 5 Health Trusts in the North, while in Dublin we had a veritable “Who’s Who” from across the health spectrum, with representatives from the Department of Health, HSE, a large number of private and public hospitals, hospital groups, all the health insurers and some suppliers to the sector.

Recognition of the importance of data, both at the patient and at the organisation level, was evident across both audiences, particularly against the backdrop of the ongoing need for more efficiencies and ever-increasing patient volumes.

David Bolton, Qlik’s Global Director of Health, provided insights into best of breed data solutions implemented worldwide. He referenced New South Wales, where 35,000 health care professionals have access to Qlik to help them in their work across clinical care, administration, operations, and finance. Use cases include the length of stay prediction apps, length of stay variation analysis and clinical insights, resulting in a verifiable saving of A$500M to date. While David also provided a scary insight into the data behind the opioid addiction crisis in the USA, the same data demonstrated what needs to be done to eliminate the problem, by highlighting at a micro-level the sources of the prescription excesses.

                                                                                                                                                 

Mark Singleton is Associate Director at Wrightington, Wigan and Leigh NHS Foundation Trust. Mark told a very compelling story about how a change in culture, combined with analytical insights, has transformed the Trust and delivered huge improvements in its KPIs and ratings within the totality of NHS trusts. Mark highlighted how his developers were not the typical backroom technical workers, but rather a combination of frontline healthcare staff working in combination with the data analysts and developers to deliver solutions which matched the needs of a busy workforce in a demanding environment. The topic that elicited most interest was Wigan’s predictive model for forecasting staffing needs in A&E, which provides short, medium and long-term demand data.

 

                                                                                                                                

Eoin Darcy, Program Manager for Business Intelligence and Open Data in the HSE, Ireland’s largest organisation, with over 100,000 staff, detailed the journey being travelled by the HSE in relation to its data. Now moving from reporting on “What has happened?” to “Why?”, Eoin detailed plans to improve capabilities across the organisation to embrace predictive and scenario planning, while also dealing with considerable challenges around GDPR and change management.

HSE’s BI Journey

The Beacon Hospital’s data journey was described by Derek Kirwan. As a for-profit company, The Beacon combines goals of providing excellent patient care with the commercial aim of achieving revenue growth and profit. Absolute accuracies in costings, driving operational efficiencies and providing the commercial teams with the best possible data for negotiations with insurers and other purchasers have been the prime drivers of The Beacon’s ongoing investment in Qlik and new applications. Uses also envisaged include allocating patients to beds to minimise travel time for busy consultants.

 

The four speakers brought very different perspectives to the event, providing a wealth of knowledge and insight to the attendees, and delivering an appreciation of the complexity of the health care challenges we face.

Qlik’s capabilities in terms of addressing the challenges, providing real insights and ultimately leading to better care and outcomes for more patients was seen by all. Everyone agreed, however, that it is the healthcare professionals themselves who will make the difference. Combining their skills and commitment to improved access to data and a can-do culture will deliver the efficiencies and improvements needed across the world to provide world-class health to all.

 



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